Nagoonberry

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Half-Grain Egg Bread

8 Comments

Liesl is not a big fan of whole wheat.  I’ll eat almost anything (unfortunately), but she has a much more discriminating palate.  Her well-developed olfactory sense contributes to some of her dislikes–including whole wheat.

One trick that works is King Arthur Flour’s suggested addition of a small amount of orange juice–it neutralizes the taste of the tannins in the whole wheat.

Easier still is another offering from King Arthur–their White Whole Wheat Flour.   When Liesl was diagnosed with a barley allergy, I had to become a flour expert–which brands of wheat flour include barley, what stores stock those flours, how those flours work in various applications, etc.

Barley shows up in most bread flours.  I think it has something to do with gluten and/or browning.  I rotate between a few brands of all-purpose flour, but my favorite is the Organic Unbleached White Flour from Bob’s Red Mill.  Has to be organic–Bob’s regular white flour has barley in it.  But it’s hard to find.  I have the best luck at Natural Pantry in Anchorage, but even there it’s often out of stock.  All of the barley-free white flours are quite expensive–I think I paid about $6.99 for the last 5-pound bag I bought.

Enter King Arthur’s White Whole Wheat flour.  Not only is it barley-free, it’s less expensive, and a whole grain.  And–best of all–it doesn’t taste like whole grain.

Liesl’s favorite is the Egg Bread recipe from Bread Machine Magic.  I make the large recipe in my bread machine, set it on the “dough” setting, and divide the dough between two, one-pound loaf pans.  One goes in the freezer, and the other gets devoured pretty quickly.  Yesterday, though, I made one loaf of bread—and a pan of cinnamon rolls, which we enjoyed for breakfast this morning.

Here’s the adapted Egg Bread recipe:

Half Grain Egg Bread

  • 1 cup milk
  • 3 eggs
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 4 tablespoons butter
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 2 cups all purpose white flour
  • 2 cups King Arthur White Whole Wheat flour
  • 2 1/2 teaspoons yeast

I also add two heaping tablespoons of vital wheat gluten, since I’m not using bread flour.  And lately I’ve been warming the milk and butter together in the microwave before adding it to the breadmaker–thirty seconds or so.  It seems to make a nicer dough.  If you’re more organized than I am, you could simply let all the ingredients come up to room temperature, and I’m sure that would accomplish the same thing.

Happy baking!

 

 

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8 thoughts on “Half-Grain Egg Bread

  1. Can you use the King Arthur’s like regular white AP flour or do you have to alter recipes like for regular whole wheat flour?

    • I think it’s a case-by-case basis. I’ve started making my banana bread with 100% KA white whole wheat, and it really works. I didn’t notice much if any difference in yesterday’s cinnamon rolls. The extra texture might show in something really delicate, though. I keep the KA www in the freezer, btw.

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  3. I too have an allergy to barley and I am so thrilled that you posted this recipe. It is good to know I am not the only one.

  4. You might like to know that Wrigley Farms in Delta Junction is building a grain mill (they grow wheat and barley). A bunch of us Anchorage and Eagle River folks have bought the whole grains from them, but are really pleased to know we’ll be able to buy Alaska-grown wheat and barley flour soon, too. Check out their Facebook page: Alaska Flour Company, https://www.facebook.com/pages/Alaska-Flour-Company/186637121403910.

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